Tuesday, January 21, 2014

sectarianism: these humans purportedly becoming less violent - with one exception


alternet |  Studies demonstrate the world is becoming less violent, and that human warfare is on the decline. There is one aspect of the human existence, however, that continues to ignite humans to commit violence and atrocities against fellow humans. A major new study published by the Pew Research Center [3] shows that religious hostilities reached a 6-year high in 2012.

Dr. Steven Pinker, Pulitzer prize-winning author and Harvard psychology professor, writes, “Today we may be living in the most peaceful era in our species’ existence.” He acknowledges: “In a century that began with 9/11, Iraq, and Darfur, the claim that we are living in an unusually peaceful time may strike you as somewhere between hallucinatory and obscene.” Pinker points out, wars make headlines, but there are fewer conflicts today, and wars don’t kill as many people as they did in the Middle Ages, for instance. Also, global rates of violent crime have plummeted in the last few decades. Pinker notes that the reason for these advances are complex but certainly the rise of education, and a growing willingness to put ourselves in the shoes of others has played its part.

Religiosity, however, continues to play its part in promoting in-group out-group thinking, which casts the difference between people in terms of eternal rewards and punishments. Sam Harris, author of Letter to a Christian Nation, observes, “Faith inspires violence in two ways. First, people often kill other human beings because they believe the creator of the universe wants them to do it…Second, far greater numbers of people fall into conflict with one another because they define their moral community on the basis of their religious affiliation: Muslims side with Muslims, Protestants with Protestants, Catholics with Catholics.”

According to the Pew Research Center, a third (33%) of the 198 countries and territories included in the study had high religious hostilities in 2012, up from 29% in 2011 and 20% as of mid-2007. Notably, religious hostilities increased in every major region of the world except the Americas, with the most dramatic increases felt in areas still reeling from the effects of the 2010-11 political uprisings known as the Arab Spring.

The study demonstrates there has been a sizable increase in the share of countries with high or very high levels of social hostilities involving religion. “Incidents of abuse targeting religious minorities were reported in 47% of countries in 2012, up from 38% in 2011, and 24% in the baseline year of the study (2007).” Pew cites several illustrations of religious minorities being attacked by the perpetrators of the majority faith. In Buddhist-majority Sri Lanka, for example, monks attacked Muslim and Christian places of worship in April 2012. Several worshippers were killed in an attack on a Coptic Orthodox Church in Libya, which according to the U.S. State Department was the first attack on a church in Libya since the 2011 revolution.

“One of the common things we see in that group of countries is sectarian conflict,” said Brian J. Grim, senior researcher at Pew Research. “In Pakistan, even though minority religious groups like Christians face hostility, there’s also inter-Muslim conflict between Sunnis, Shias and Ahmadi Muslims.”

4 comments:

BigDonOne said...

The described "tranquility" has corresponded to the rising consumption of drugs. Half the F'n world is now stoned out of its skull, and stoned folks are dis-inclined to fight......

Nakajima Kikka said...

Big Don, the described "tranquility" also corresponds to the rising consumption of chocolate. People sated with chocolate are not only dis-inclined to fight, but they're also more inclined to be friendly and affectionate with each other.

BigDonOne said...

Well, consider Fuzzlim countries where drug possession is a capital offense. The top Fuzzlims know that a stoned population isn't interested in Jihad and that's bad for their whole conquer-the-world agenda. But, AFAIK, they have no problem with chocolate.....

"Saudi Arabia is considered one of the largest markets for chocolates in the Middle East with annual sales reaching more than SR 500 million. Ramadan, Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha are considered the golden seasons for chocolate traders in the country." http://www.arabnews.com/saudi-chocolate-market-estimated-sr-500-million

Nakajima Kikka said...

Exactly, BigDon! That's why the interiors of Saudi homes are all decorated in such romantic styles.
(Hello Kitty)^12

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