Friday, January 06, 2012

the ship MUST BE sinking...,


Fist tap Nomad.

10 comments:

nomadfiles said...

lol.
So you do liminal too. What's your definition?

CNu said...

Below the threshold of ordinary awareness. Welcome to the spot.

nomadfiles said...

Cool. Mine has to do with the boundary between two (racial) domains. Specifically black and white.

CNu said...

Is that racial boundary objectively real, or, does it exist exclusively in the imagination?

Is "race" objectively real?

nomadfiles said...

I think of it as I think of race itself: a social construct. Imaginary by no means. Objective? Yes, to the extent that it is universally experienced.

nomadfiles said...

(excerpt from my "Beyond the Pale"

"Liminality"*
Liminality is the other overriding issue in the history of  black American art. As with the meta-issue of double consciousness, it is an umbrella term for several interrelated issues. Liminality refers to a particular kind of relationship between entities, whether persons, social groups, institutions or abstractions. This relationship is characterized by separation. Usually liminal relationships are relationships between unequal constituents, usually individual or group versus institutions. The focus of the liminal relationship is the dividing line; between races, naturally, but also between cultures and communities; between consciousness and obliviousness. In the case of black American art there are two important aspects: thresholds and borderlines. On the one hand discussion may hinge on the boundary between one individual, group or institution and another. On the other discussion of black American art may pivot around thresholds of awareness. And the threshold of “mainstream” awareness in particular.
In the final analysis the meta-issues of liminality and double consciousness are themselves two aspects of a single phenomenon, two perspectives on a single problem: the relationship between the black artist and the institution of art history. Whether the dialectic manifests itself as one of liminality or one of identity depends upon which constituent of the relationship is under examination. When focusing on the black artist, issues of identity emerge. When the focus is on the institution of art history, issues of liminality emerge.
*[Apologies to Victor Turner; but this is my own definition of the word. Call it "liminality definition #2"]

CNu said...

Bro. Nomad,

A couple examples if you don't mind to help concretely illustrate to a novice (myself) what you mean.

Calling Gee Chee Vision, Master Vision - I think this one may be for you, sir!

nomadfiles said...

On the borderline. Not black. Not white. Mulatto. Possessing some of the freedom of whites, some of the unfreedom of blacks. The threshold that must be passed in order to pass. Racial intermediacy. The first black American artists, for example, more white than black, yet not able to fully participate in Euro-American culture. Joshua Johnston, first. And finally Henry Ossawa Tanner, the last of the old school mulatto artists (and the first modern Negro artist) coming at a point when the old three tier system of racial classification was crumbling, under the weight of the one drop rule.

nanakwame said...

We been a mulatto nation for a very long time before the Civil War; not in skin tone but mainly in culture. It has been denied so deeply in the American psychic. A blues man once stated that. And why the Supremacy called our nation all kind of derogatory terms, especially the Germans.

nomadfiles said...

Before the Civil War mulattoes ("free-blacks, though not all free-blacks were mulatto most were) functioned as an intermediate racial class. They were like the "coloreds" of S Africa. After the Civil War that class was united with the newly freed slaves becoming the new people: variously referred to as the New Negro, black bourgeoisie, Afro-American. Most recently "B"lack and African American.