Saturday, December 14, 2019

Or Prehistory Decoded?


cosmictusk |  Any follower of Catastrophism the last few years has enjoyed extraordinary confirmations of ancient cosmic cataclysm and novel contributions to our way of thinking.

To the Tusk, three revelations have characterized the period: The discovery of an impossibly youthful late Pleistocene crater in Greenland; a series of popular, comprehensive and unrefuted major journal articles with exquisite hard evidence for the Younger Dryas impact catastrophe; and the singular contribution of Dr. Martin Sweatman in his fabulous book, Prehistory Decoded.

Dr. Sweatman has done our planet and history a tremendous favor by writing Prehistory Decoded. By employing the hard science of probability, he has managed to demystify the world’s very earliest and most ‘mysterious’ art.

Prehistory Decoded begins by documenting Sweatman’s initial discovery, reported worldwide in 2017, of an empirical method for decoding the world’s first art using pattern matching and statistics.
Guess what? The code is a memorial and date stamp for our favorite subject here: the Younger Dryas Catastrophe, and its associated Taurid meteor traumas.

Sweatman has managed to produce a synthesis explanation for the previously indecipherable succession of artistic animal figures at Gobekeli Tepe in Turkey, Chauvet Cave in France, Lascaux Cave in France, and Çatalhöyük in Turkey, among others. Unsurprisingly to the open minded, the ancient artists are communicating using a universally handy and persistent reference set: Stars.
Or, more precisely, the appearance of constellations as adjusted over time according to earth’s precession. (Don’t you love the internet? One hyperlink and no need to explain all that!)