Sunday, October 06, 2013

peer-to-peer science and fukushima's century-long challenge to humanity


fpip | More than two years after an earthquake and tsunami wreaked havoc on a Japanese power plant, the Fukushima nuclear disaster is one of the most serious threats to public health in the Asia-Pacific, and the worst case of nuclear contamination the world has ever seen. Radiation continues to leak from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi site into groundwater, threatening to contaminate the entire Pacific Ocean. The cleanup will require an unprecedented global effort.
Initially, the leaked radioactive materials consisted of cesium-137 and 134, and to a lesser degree iodine-131. Of these, the real long-term threat comes from cesium-137, which is easily absorbed into bodily tissue—and its half-life of 30 years means it will be a threat for decades to come. Recent measurements indicate that escaping water also has increasing levels of strontium-90, a far more dangerous radioactive material than cesium. Strontium-90 mimics calcium and is readily absorbed into the bones of humans and animals.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) recently announced that it lacks the expertise to effectively control the flow of radiation into groundwater and seawater and is seeking help from the Japanese government. TEPCO has proposed setting up a subterranean barrier around the plant by freezing the ground, thereby preventing radioactive water from eventually leaking into the ocean—an approach that has never before been attempted in a case of massive radiation leakage. TEPCO has also proposed erecting additional walls now that the existing wall has been overwhelmed by the approximately 400 tons per day of water flowing into the power plant.

But even if these proposals were to succeed, they would not constitute a long-term solution.

A New Space Race
Solving the Fukushima Daiichi crisis needs to be considered a challenge akin to putting a person on the moon in the 1960s. This complex technological feat will require focused attention and the concentration of tremendous resources over decades. But this time the effort must be international, as the situation potentially puts the health of hundreds of millions at risk. The long-term solution to this crisis deserves at least as much attention from government and industry as do nuclear proliferation, terrorism, the economy, and crime.

To solve the Fukushima Daiichi problem will require enlisting the best and the brightest to come up with a long-term plan to be implemented over the next century. Experts from around the world need to contribute their insights and ideas. They should come from diverse fields—engineering, biology, demographics, agriculture, philosophy, history, art, urban design, and more. They will need to work together at multiple levels to develop a comprehensive assessment of how to rebuild communities, resettle people, control the leakage of radiation, dispose safely of the contaminated water and soil, and contain the radiation. They will also need to find ways to completely dismantle the damaged reactor, although that challenge may require technologies not available until decades from now.
Such a plan will require the development of unprecedented technologies, such as robots that can function in highly radioactive environments. This project might capture the imagination of innovators in the robotics world and give a civilian application to existing military technology. Improved robot technology would prevent the tragic scenes of old people and others volunteering to enter into the reactors at the risk of their own wellbeing.

The Fukushima disaster is a crisis for all of humanity, but it is a crisis that can serve as an opportunity to construct global networks for unprecedented collaboration. Groups or teams aided by sophisticated computer technology can start to break down into workable pieces the immense problems resulting from the ongoing spillage. Then experts can come back with the best recommendations and a concrete plan for action. The effort can draw on the precedents of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but it must go far further.

In his book Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science, Michael Nielsen describes principles of networked science that can be applied on an unprecedented scale. The breakthroughs that come from this effort can also be used for other long-term programs such as the cleanup of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico or the global response to climate change. The collaborative research regarding Fukushima should take place on a very large scale, larger than the sequencing of the human genome or the maintenance of the Large Hadron Collider.

Finally, there is an opportunity to entirely reinvent the field of public diplomacy in response to this crisis. Public diplomacy can move from a somewhat ambiguous effort by national governments to repackage their messaging to a serious forum for debate and action on international issues. As public diplomacy matures through the experience of Fukushima, we can devise new strategies for bringing together hundreds of thousands of people around the world to respond to mutual threats. Taking a clue from networked science, public diplomacy could serve as a platform for serious, long-term international collaboration on critical topics such as poverty, renewable energy, and pollution control.

5 comments:

BigDonOne said...

Actually, atmospheric nuclear testing and Fukushima may have *IMPROVED* overall world health.
How much nuclear radiation are you ever destined to receive from these sources...?? Probably not much
unless you live next door. Read about dude who was zapped at both Hiroshima *AND* Nagasaki
and died recently at ripe old age of *93* ---> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsutomu_Yamaguchi

Turns out a bit of radiation tends to be actually *good* for you. It reduces cancer incidence.
See graph below from http://www.ecolo.org/documents/documents_in_english/LowDose-Scott_Oct_06.pdf
The process is called Hormesis ---> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hormesis When this became known,

some wag suggested disposing of nuclear waste by mixing some into every new home foundation
to benefit the future occupants..


BD attributes his considerable geriatric brilliance partially to having consumed, for the last 40 years, a dozen or so 6oz cans per month of delicious white albacore tuna, Pacific testing radio-nucleides and all.....

Tom said...

"Actually, atmospheric nuclear testing, Chernobyl and Fukushima may have*IMPROVED* overall world healt"



BD all I accused you of was one "rare on-topic comment." That could happen to anybody no matter how impaired. You don't need to turn yourself inside-out proving yet again how insane and dishonest you are; I believe you.

ken said...

Why do you suppose the hunter gatherers gave up egalitarianism. I really am leaning away from the farming link.


They did organize farming
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=9JaJuuq8dcU

BigDonOne said...

Hey! Chill !! -- It was a slow weekend and BD was just messin' with ur head....

CNu said...

Forced cultural and ecological contact with devils and resultant fall from grace...,

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