Tuesday, May 24, 2011

bank foreclosure holdings crushing housing sales

NYTimes | The nation’s biggest banks and mortgage lenders have steadily amassed real estate empires, acquiring a glut of foreclosed homes that threatens to deepen the housing slump and create a further drag on the economic recovery.

All told, they own more than 872,000 homes as a result of the groundswell in foreclosures, almost twice as many as when the financial crisis began in 2007, according to RealtyTrac, a real estate data provider. In addition, they are in the process of foreclosing on an additional one million homes and are poised to take possession of several million more in the years ahead.

Five years after the housing market started teetering, economists now worry that the rise in lender-owned homes could create another vicious circle, in which the growing inventory of distressed property further depresses home values and leads to even more distressed sales. With the spring home-selling season under way, real estate prices have been declining across the country in recent months.

“It remains a heavy weight on the banking system,” said Mark Zandi, the chief economist of Moody’s Analytics. “Housing prices are falling, and they are going to fall some more.”

Over all, economists project that it would take about three years for lenders to sell their backlog of foreclosed homes. As a result, home values nationally could fall 5 percent by the end of 2011, according to Moody’s, and rise only modestly over the following year. Regions that were hardest hit by the housing collapse and recession could take even longer to recover — dealing yet another blow to a still-struggling economy.

Although sales have picked up a bit in the last few weeks, banks and other lenders remain overwhelmed by the wave of foreclosures. In Atlanta, lenders are repossessing eight homes for each distressed home they sell, according to March data from RealtyTrac. In Minneapolis, they are bringing in at least six foreclosed homes for each they sell, and in once-hot markets like Chicago and Miami, the ratio still hovers close to two to one.

Before the housing implosion, the inflow and outflow figures were typically one-to-one.

6 comments:

Big Don said...

You won't find this in the NYT...the straight-up trooth-
 http://www.vdare.com/sailer/110522_wallison.htm
"What the U.S. had in 2007-2008 was a 'Minority Mortgage Meltdown', and it precipitated our first 'Diversity Recession' ”

Big Don said...

Your numbers are, of course, correct.  But Sailer's point was the whole process started when Clinton et al "progressives" trashed the responsible lending standards so  otherwise-unqualified NAMS could get houses.  Then the (much more numerous) unqualified whites jumped on board.  Since Subrealism saw fit to post all the grim statistics this morning, it's only fair to examine the finer points of the root cause...

Big Don said...

Never would have happened otherwise...

Dale Asberry said...

Lolololololol, BD comes through with my Big Laugh of the day!

BD, it's always been about Reagan (supply-side economics, neoliberalism, and rollback of banking laws) and rich, white banksters.

BD, which cherished belief does this challenge for you?

Cavite Housing said...

it's a big deal in the  real estate industry if the economy is getting down...

cavitehomes said...

http://cavitehomes.com

Second demotion to Big Don