Tuesday, March 13, 2012

advanced engineering in the temples of the pharoahs...,



gizapower | What does the face of Ramses have in common with a modern precision engineering object, such as an automobile? It has flowing contours with distinct features that are perfectly mirrored one side to the other. The fact that one side of Ramses face is a perfect mirror image to the other implies that precise measurements had to have been used in its creation. It means that the statue was carved in intricate detail to create precise three-dimensional surfaces. The jaw-lines, eyes, nose and mouth are symmetrical and were created using a geometric scheme that embodies the Pythagorean Triangle as well as the Golden Rectangle and Golden Triangle. Encoded in the granite is the sacred geometry of the ancients.

When I was researching for my book, The Giza Power Plant, I had my first encounter with Ramses the Great. This was at the open air museum at Memphis. It was in 1986 and my interest was mostly engineering and the pyramids, so I was not necessarily interested in statues or visiting the temples in the south. It struck me as peculiar at the time, though, that while looking down the length of the 300 ton Ramses statue I noticed that the nostrils were identically shaped and symmetrical. The significance of this feature gained more prominence when I eventually visited the temples in 2004 and became fascinated with the three-dimensional perfection of the Ramses statues at Luxor. This fascination prompted me to gather digital images so that I could examine some of the features of Ramses in the computer. What I discovered was remarkable in that the images revealed a much higher level of manufacturing technology than what has been discussed previously.

In gathering the images of Ramses, it was important that the camera was oriented along the central axis of the head. This way the distribution of material on the left and right side was equal. In order to compare one side of the face to the other, a copy of the image was made, flipped horizontally and made 50% transparent. Then the reverse image was positioned over the original to compare the two sides. The results are remarkable. The stunning implications are analogous to looking through the static interference pattern of time and confusion and seeing the elegance and precision that is normally built into a Lexus in a place where only the most rudimentary techniques of manufacturing are thought to have existed. The techniques that the ancient Egyptians are supposed to have used—those taught us in school—would not produce the precision of a Model T Ford, let alone a Lexus or a Porsche.

We know that the ancient Egyptians used a grid in their designs, and that such a method or technique for design is intuitively self-evident. It does not require a quantum leap of an artisan’s imagination to arrive at what is today a common design method. In fact, it is used now not just for design, but also for describing organizational and conceptual methodology. Grids, graphs, and charts are used to convey information and to plot and organize work.

With this in mind, therefore, I took the photograph of Ramses and laid a grid over it. Of course, my first task was to establish the size and number of the cells used in the grid. I assumed that the features of the face would lead me to the answer, and studied which features were most prominent. After musing over this puzzle for a while, I took a chance on a grid that was based on the dimensions of the mouth. It seemed to me that the mouth had something to tell us due to its unnaturally upturned shape, so I placed a grid with cell dimensions that were the same height and half the width of the dimensions of the mouth. It was then a simple matter to generate circles based on the geometry of the facial features. I didn’t expect, though, that they would line up with grid lines in so many locations. In fact, I was astounded by this discovery. Going through my mind was: “Okay—now when does this cease to be a coincidence and become a reflection of truth?”

Plumbing the grid for further information, I discovered that Ramses’ mouth had the same proportions as a classic 3-4-5 right triangle. The idea that the ancient Egyptians had known about the Pythagorean triangle before Pythagoras, and they may have even taught Pythagoras its concepts, has been discussed by scholars, though not without controversy. Ramses presented me with a grid based on the Pythagorean triangle, whether it was the ancient Egyptians’ intentions or not. As we can see in figure 5, the Pythagorean grid allows us to analyze the face as it has never been analyzed before.

The Ramses geometry and precision and the discovery of tool marks on some of the statues are discussed at greater length in Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt. Small seemingly insignificant mistakes made by ancient tools bring to light information from which a precise controlled method of manufacture can be discerned.

Other remarkable features of machining on granite are also examined, but probably the most stunning example of ancient machining lies on a wind-swept hill 5 miles from the Giza Plateau. Abu Roash has recently been advertised as the “Lost Pyramid” by Zahi Hawass, the secretary general of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities, even though it has been well known and written about for many years. I wasn’t expecting much when I first visited the site in February 2006, but what I found was a piece of granite so remarkable that I returned to that site 3 more times to show witnesses in order to explain its unique features. Those who accompanied me on different occasions were David Childress, Judd Peck, Edward Malkowski, Dr. Arlan Andrews and Dr. Randall Ashton. Edward Malkowski immediately dubbed the stone the new rose-red Rosetta Stone. Mechanical engineer Arlan Andrews independently came to the same conclusion.

8 comments:

Big Don said...

....OTOH, it's a piece of cake to just make a template and flip it over to easily reproduce/generate complex opposite-hand contours.  You don't hafta know *any* math or analytic geometry at all......

nomad said...

it's a piece of cake to just make a template and flip it over 
Not really. Even on a small scale, it's impossible without knowledge of geometry. I've dealt with the problem of exact symmetry in a lot of my own art work. To  attain such exactitude at that scale is phenomenal. Stupendously so. Requiring, perhaps, an understanding of mathematics that exceeds our own. 

CNu said...

whew...., I was hoping one of the artists in residence, (Nomad, Kurman, GeeCheeVision) would chime in with some subject matter expertise with regard to the actuals and factuals involved in producing such sculpture. I've had the opportunity to spend some time with an ancient mechanical engineer named Ed Welch who possesses the gift of exacting drafting skills and is a master machinist to boot, and I've seen some of his highly complex moving constructions - and - no way no how did the notion of a template enter into those transactions.

Giving BD the benefit of the doubt as an engineer, I'm thinking "well, maybe he knows a thing or two about a thing or two and has commented in good faith" but then.....,

Big Don said...

The way we used to do it with model cars, clay or balsa wood, take a strip of wood, drill lotta holes in a line, stick a pointed dowel (tight fit)  thru each hole.  Affix the strip/dowel assy next to the pattern side, push each dowel thru the strip til it just touches the pattern.  Move to other side and carve away wherever it's high.  No math involved, pretty damned close symmetry short of a numerically-controlled milling machine......

CNu said...

I think that's the whole point of the video exposition BD. The precision and symmetry exhibited in exceedingly hard materials by these Egyptian sculptors rivals or exceeds that obtained by numerically controlled milling machines...,

John Kurman said...

Couldn't tell ya. I know Borglum used plaster models with precise measurements, and then just scaled up to Mount Rushmore, an inch to a foot, so nothing more complicated than multiplying by 12. In the works I've done for the weekend sculptor, that's what I'd do, simple arithmetic. But I wouldn't rule out the savant skills of humans versus machine technologies. After all, who built the machines?

CNu said...

Thanks for weighing in John.

Is there any geodetic, geometric, or other structural information embedded in Mount Rushmore? Are you familiar with Schwaller de Lubicz, the Temple in Man and Sacred Science - and what do you make of all that if so?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._A._Schwaller_de_Lubicz

Ed's savant skills were diligently and exhaustively sussed out after the Manhattan Project. He is not an accident, rather, his talents were the deliverable resulting from a massive project in savant identification and development.

nomad said...

What I find interesting too is that the artists/designer/priest whatever felt the need to do this with the human face. Usually, in art as in life both halves of the face are mirror images of the other half. But not exactly. These guys went to extreme lengths to make both the left and right side of the face absolute reverse images of each other. Perfect symmetry.

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