Saturday, December 27, 2008

Fundamental Innovation....,

So, I've been asking some questions about innovation over at Spence's in response to his post The 21st Century Crisis of the Black Intellectual. As fate would have it, Ed Dunn wrote a stunning example of fundamental innovation in practice just a couple days ago. Responding to a Question About Google, Inc. Search Operation
I received a question regarding Google, Inc. search operation presented by their founders nearly 10 years ago and that document can be seen here. This is my response and “they” specifically means Google, Inc.:

I saw the holes in this presentation when I first read it nearly 10 years ago.

I do not believe they are scalable and their approach created tremendous amount of opportunity for me. Most of their approach is self-imposed overhead and an albatross they created that won’t be easy to remove when competing against us.

The primary component needed for a scalable search operation is giving web site operations the power to index themselves. I believe they believed too much in their own search algorithms due to personal arrogance. And this documented made the same mistake all the other search operations have done that I have not - they mistaken the ‘customer’ as the people who perform search (due to advertiser-orientated mentality) where I identified the customer as the web site operators who provides the content (due to an empowerment mentality).

In summary, they were arrogant to assume they could index/organize it all and better than the web site operators operating collectively and in self-interest. In fact, their pay-per-click system invalidates this outdated document because majority of their revenue is dependent on web site operators bidding on keywords and they (and other search operations) have yet to find a viable revenue model that support this document.

This goes directly to the heart of my recent post about economics which Mr. Dunn correctly and succinctly summarized thus;
This phenom also happened in the search/information retrieval industry where these complex text algorithms and AI patterns designed by these Phd grads are way out of touch of simple human context.

I find this observation to be interesting because it fundamentally explains why I feel to be the only one who can see the weakness in current search models and algorithms..
and underscores a broad intersection of complementary interests that could be expeditiously merged and served if folks put their heads together in just a little bit of discussion about collaboration.