Sunday, December 28, 2014

necropolitics: rule of law: them bad apples is the POINT | In England and the United States, the police were invented within the space of just a few decades—roughly from 1825 to 1855.
The new institution was not a response to an increase in crime, and it really didn’t lead to new methods for dealing with crime. The most common way for authorities to solve a crime, before and since the invention of police, has been for someone to tell them who did it.
Besides, crime has to do with the acts of individuals, and the ruling elites who invented the police were responding to challenges posed by collective action. To put it in a nutshell: The authorities created the police in response to large, defiant crowds. That’s
— strikes in England,
— riots in the Northern US,
— and the threat of slave insurrections in the South.
So the police are a response to crowds, not to crime.
I will be focusing a lot on who these crowds were, how they became such a challenge. We’ll see that one difficulty for the rulers, besides the growth of social polarization in the cities, was the breakdown of old methods of personal supervision of the working population. In these decades, the state stepped in to fill the social breach.
We’ll see that, in the North, the invention of the police was just one part of a state effort to manage and shape the workforce on a day-to-day basis. Governments also expanded their systems of poor relief in order to regulate the labor market, and they developed the system of public education to regulate workers’ minds. I will connect those points to police work later on, but mostly I’ll be focusing on how the police developed in London, New York, Charleston (South Carolina), and Philadelphia.


rohan said...

This is some really good shit Dale.

Constructive_Feedback said...

I guess it all matters who "WE" is per your range of vision.

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CNu said...

Bro-Con-Feed..., what exactly did Malaysia/Indonesia do to piss off empowered other global elites to the point where their jetliners keep disappearing like hotcakes?

Constructive_Feedback said...

Just like the FedEx (or UPS) cargo plane that crashed in Saudi Arabia - a likely terrorist act that we told was an "accident" - I suspect that - EXCEPT for the Malasian Air flight shot down over Ukraine - we have more terrorist related aviation incidents in these nations that have more security holes than "The Western" aviation ports have.